Lewis Cass High School, Walton, Indiana,

Kings' Courier

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Pygmy Goats Coming and Going

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     Many farmers around our county have boer goats or milk goats. Unlike many people, my grandpa, Denny Collins, has pygmy goats. Pygmy goats are short legged goats that can live in almost any climate. My grandpa started raising pygmy goats about five or six years ago because they are very easy to take care of and they hardly cause any harm.

     The first two pygmy goats my grandpa ever purchased were white and dark blue colored. When he brought them to his house, I immediately rode my four wheeler to his house to see what they looked like. When I first glanced at them, I thought it was a dog in the cage. When I took a few steps further, I then saw it was two pygmy goats. My grandpa then opened the cage and had myself carry one at a time into the barn. The average pygmy goat weighs about sixty pounds. When I first picked them up, I thought they were going to weigh at least one hundred pounds, but it felt that they only weighed about forty to fifty pounds each. I thought they were going to weigh more because they are about the size of a dog but they have huge stomachs, but I was wrong.

     My grandpa now has seven nanny (female) goats, six babies, and one billy (male) goat. Many people drive by my grandpa’s house without stopping in the winter and see the older goats but in the summer, when the babies are born, about four to five vehicle’s stop along the road to see them. Many people also call my grandpa to see if he has any babies for sale, and usually he does but this year all of the babies are already sold. The baby goats usually get sold quickly because they are so small and what my mom would say, “they are cute.” Also, they are funny to watch because they hop around like they have springs in their legs.

     Usually the nanny’s have no problems when the have their babies, but that was not the case this year. Four out of the five mother’s had trouble to deliver. My grandpa had to call Dr. Ciotta, a vet out of Logansport. Ciotta has helped to deliver many pygmy’s for my grandpa, so this wasn’t his first rodeo. When Ciotta arrived, he went to the back of his truck to grab a wire like object and a bottle of a liquidy lotion substance that helped him get enough grip on his hands to deliver the baby. When we got to the back of the barn, we could tell the mother was in pain. Dr. Ciotta asked if I could hold the mother in place so she wouldn’t move while he delivered it. After about five minutes, the baby was delivered without any issues. After my grandpa and I thought there was only going to be one baby, Ciotta said, “Well there’s another one.” My grandpa was thrilled to hear.

     The baby goats are now one to three weeks old. About one or two days after they are born, they instantly jump all around, jump on their mom’s back and have a lot of energy. Baby pygmy goats are what my mom says are the “cutest” animal there is. You can never fail to have animals around, running in the field, and having as pets because they always can entertain you no matter if it’s five A.M. or midnight, they always have energy.

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Lewis Cass High School, Walton, Indiana,
Pygmy Goats Coming and Going