Lewis Cass High School, Walton, Indiana,

Kings' Courier

More Than Just An Emergency Room

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Four months ago I waltzed into the Logansport Memorial Hospital Emergency Room as a bright-eyed, bushy-tailed intern. Within a half hour of my first day, my enthusiastic, eager optimism washed itself down the drain. Someone shook my hand and promptly said,“too bad you didn’t get here earlier… we had a had a code blue that would have been a hell of a first day!” Monitors around me were sounding alarms that no one seemed to care about. Background calls lights and IV’s were emitting beeps; phones were ringing off the hook. A patient asked me where room 14 was; I did not even know where the exit was, let alone the room numbers. All I could think was, “What did I get myself into? Am I in too deep to quit?” My mom always tells me the first (AND last) two weeks of anything are the hardest whether it be a job, school, sport, club, or even an internship. From the deepest part of my soul, I prayed my mother’s advice was true.
Slowly, the first two weeks passed and each day got easier. I had figured out room numbers like the back of my hand; I learned to answer call lights and decipher the harmless alarms vs the emergent alarms that the monitors emit. The next four months flew by way too fast; I now have about two weeks left as a high school intern. My mom is correct- the first AND last two weeks are the hardest. I find myself staying 15 minutes later each day. I go into patient rooms to soak up as many nurse and physician assessments as possible. I find it harder and harder to leave each day. Within these past four months I have realized the Logansport Memorial Emergency Room is more than just a plain old, run of the mill “emergency room.” The staff is composed of multiple unit secretaries, techs, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and physicians. These wonderful people are more than a “staff.” They are like a little community that would not succeed without one another.
Unit secretaries such as Chelsie Arnold and Rachel Morning are the hub of the emergency room; they keep the entire department above water and running smoothly. Rachel has been a unit secretary for 12 years. She claims the trick of keeping calm and on top of everything is “creating lists to check off… oh and I can’t forget I have to know lots of phone numbers.” Unit secretaries are in charge of answering phones, helping with admission paperwork, printing lab labels, and various other IMPORTANT tasks such as gathering transfer paperwork.
Techs positions are filled by some wonderful people such as Tom Skinner, David Noel, and Leighanne Ellis. A patient’s ER visit begins with triage; David Noel is one of the first people patients see. David states, “Start their visit with a smile and make the patient feel important.” I can personally attest that a smile goes a long way in a stressful situation. Andy Homburg has been a nurse for an amazing 42 years! Her secret of making patient visits go smoothly is all in her voice. “I like to lower my tone of voice and try to speak in a gentle manner. ER visits are never pleasant for patients… a soft, caring tone can diffuse the tension and makes patients feel like a priority.”
Cheri Shively has been an ER nurse at Logan Memorial for 11 years. I have never met a person with so much patience and kindness. I asked Cheri how she maintains her optimistic smile and calm attitude during emergent, stressful, or irritating situations. “I am pretty sure I just have a chemical imbalance… it’s like the opposite of depression. I guess I just have the ER mindset.” Michelle Skinner, who has been a nurse for nearly eight years, always takes the time to explain concepts, answer questions, and guide me through “foundations” of nursing. She states, “Actual practice happens to be completely different than textbook instructions.” She told me that since I am pursuing a career as a nurse the least she can do is critique and help me master basic skills. She says I will start my clinicals with a great foundation to build off of, but also I will have confidence in my ability to complete basic tasks. Dr. Tim Hodgini has been a doctor for 26 years; he is very good to let me watch procedures such as sutures, staples, or intubations. During non-emergent procedures such as gluing a wound or suturing a wound, he takes the time to explain what and why he is doing certain steps.
Dr. Hodgini was quick to say, “Observing can be a wonderful teaching experience. Particularly as a new student, you may pick up or remember something I said. When you’re in school, you will be thrown lots of information at once. My goal is to teach you something so that you remember the information at a later time.”
I can’t forget about Renee Sholty, Director of Emergency Services, and Gloria Mittica, Patient Care Coordinator. The only reason I get to take part in such a great program is because these women were willing to let the ER be a teaching experience. Renee says, “I took part in a similar program that helped me confirm what I wanted to do for a living; that is the reason I chose to take part in the internship program.” Gloria gave me a great orientation into the program; she taught me the do’s and dont’s of healthcare. Gloria sat down with me and answered all of my employment/ administration related questions and helped me fully understand confidentiality. Furthermore, she had taught me how to treat patients with care and respect.
Words cannot describe how thankful I am of the wonderful men and women I work with. I want to thank the entire emergency department staff. Because of the amazing staff I work with I can start my healthcare career with advantages over my peers. All of you have taught me how to handle different situations with poise and confidence. I have developed my own bedside manner and confidence in my abilities. Thank you all for your generosity and willingness to teach me and the other students enrolled in the program. I can attend college with peace of mind that I am in the correct field of work. I will never forget the moments I have shared with all of you… you all have exposed me to life, death, and everything in between. All of you have trained me to face the realities of the medical world.
The first two weeks I wondered what I had gotten myself into. Fast forward four months to the last two weeks and I am hard pressed to walk under that big, red sign that reads EMERGENCY for the last time.

 
Thank you- The bright-eyed, bushy-tailed intern.

Print Friendly

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • More Than Just An Emergency Room

    Courier Top Feature

    Hamlet

  • More Than Just An Emergency Room

    Courier Top Feature

    Diamonds are Forever

  • More Than Just An Emergency Room

    Courier Top Feature

    Should “Under God” Be in the Pledge?

  • More Than Just An Emergency Room

    Courier Top Feature

    ISIS Danger with Online Dating

  • More Than Just An Emergency Room

    Courier Top Feature

    “Meeting” My Idol

  • Courier Top Feature

    Miller’s Merry Manor

  • More Than Just An Emergency Room

    Courier Top Feature

    Every 15 Minutes

  • More Than Just An Emergency Room

    Courier Top Feature

    For The Girls

  • More Than Just An Emergency Room

    Courier Top Feature

    Spring Break 2k17

  • More Than Just An Emergency Room

    Courier Top Feature

    Taking on the Big Apple

Lewis Cass High School, Walton, Indiana,
More Than Just An Emergency Room