Kings' Courier

The Sport of Pheasant Hunting

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Pheasant hunting is a sport that once inhabited Indiana, and in some places it still does. Most people that hunted blame the blizzard of 1978 for the disintegration of wild pheasant hunting in Indiana. Nowadays, the only shot at pheasant hunting in Indiana is to travel to a hunting preserve where the birds are raised and then planted prior to being hunted. This, to me, takes the humaneness out of harvesting an animal. The thought of taking an animal out of a cage for it to possibly be killed makes me sick. Many hunters prefer to harvest an animal that has lived a life outside of a cage, and they feel better taking that animal over a practically defenseless animal that hasn’t had a chance to see Earth.

The Chinese Ringnecked Pheasant was brought to America in 1881 by a man named Owen Nickerson Denny. He introduced these birds to the new world in Oregon, and eventually raised and released in other states across the U.S. From this, South Dakota found its state bird, and the sport of pheasant hunting took off. Pheasant tend to live in crop fields, wetlands, grasslands, and dense bushes and trees. These birds are well-known for their beautiful shades of red, green, white, copper, and black. That sounds like a terrible color combination, but looking at the picture, I can assure you it is an amazing sight for such a small bird. These birds are 20-30 inches in length, have an average weight of two and a half pounds and they can fly at speeds of up to 40 miles per hour.

Some would not consider this a sport, but if you ask me, how hard it is to shoot an object that is 20-30 inches that can fly up to 40 miles per hour, I would say it is one of the hardest shots to make in any hunting sport. These birds make beautiful taxidermy mounts and offer a white meat breast similar to a chicken. Pheasant offer a stronger, more sweeter taste of what most people would compare to chicken, and the tenseness of the meat depends on what the birds ate and its activity. Since most birds feed on crops, the tenseness is not much of a worry to cooks. So, if you haven’t tried pheasant or pheasant hunting and want to, now you know just about everything you need to know to do so. Also, if you’re interested about making this bird wild again… raising birds and setting them free in Indiana is completely legal and wanted by some people. One of my dad’s school teachers back in the day used to raise and release his own birds.

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1 Comment

One Response to “The Sport of Pheasant Hunting”

  1. Mason Young on January 8th, 2018 10:18 am

    Great article, Brady! I really enjoyed how you talked about the history of pheasant hunting and how fast the birds can fly. I also like how you gave a description of the colors of pheasants. Great job!

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