Kings' Courier

Filed under Poetry and Prose

Sonnet 18

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






           Summer brings warmth and light. With the warm sun kissing the cheeks of children, summer symbolizes a brighter, more joyous time. For children, summer symbolizes happiness because school is out. Shakespeare uses summer as a metaphor for light and goodness in the world. The main point in the poem “Sonnet 18” can be illustrated to be that light will shine through darkness.

Throughout our lives we are faced with many obstacles. Our society promotes the idea of a “perfect person.” “His golden complexion” uses diction to describe the perfect person. Gold has much value. So a “gold complexion”  put in ours minds of a “golden child.” In the sixth stanza Shakespeare indicates that “his golden complexion dimmed.” Shakespeare used dimmed to represent that once “perfect person” did something to take his golden complexion away. So by taking his perfect status away, is the warmth in his heart gone? Because his complexion is no longer gold, is his light deceased? No.

   In the seventh stanza, it says “every fair from fair sometimes declines.” This means everyone messes up. Everyone’s “golden complexion” dims sometimes. The writer uses pathos to show every person has a dimming moment. “Every fair” means every person so every person declines. So since every person dims their golden light, do they become a cold, dark person? No.

       The sixth and seventh stanza leave a sense that everyone’s golden light aka their goodness will decline at some points in life. Shakespeare uses irony to make the reader wonder since our golden complexion dims will the warmth in us fade? The answer is no. In stanza eight Shakespeare says “But thy eternal summer shall not fade.” Summer symbolizes the warmth in us.

             Just because we mess up doesn’t mean we become cold people. Our warmth, our goodness, our summer will not fade. Summer is most people’s favorite season. Summer is the season of happiness. “Nor love possession of that fair thou ou’st” means our goodness will never lose its meaning. A rough wind will not shut out our light. Mistakes make for rainy days, but rain makes things grow. Like a rainbow after a storm, summer always comes after a cold winter. Goodness can come from badness how a rainbow comes from a dark storm.

In the final couplet of the poem, Shakespeare puts a final stamp on his thoughts. “So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see so long lives this…” I believe Shakespeare illustrates how as long as men live on this earth mistakes will be made. No perfect man exists, so as long as we live the tale reigns true. We will make mistakes, and we will have times of darkness. But with darkness comes light. How winter brings summer, our mistakes will lead to a warmer summer day and by that I mean a mistake will lead to a brighter future.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Poetry and Prose

  • Poetry and Prose

    Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day

  • Poetry and Prose

    “What Will Be Will Be”; “The Writing on The Wall”

  • Poetry and Prose

    Equality

  • Sonnet 18

    Poetry and Prose

    The World, it Stays Round

  • Poetry and Prose

    “Annabel Lee”

  • Sonnet 18

    Poetry and Prose

    Our Hardest Lesson

  • Poetry and Prose

    Fountainhead Contest Essay

  • Sonnet 18

    Opinion

    Invictus

  • Sonnet 18

    Poetry and Prose

    Beauty

Lewis Cass High School, Walton, Indiana,
Sonnet 18