Kings' Courier

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“Brave New World”

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Complete control over individuals can make their minds and lives not go down the correct path.  In Brave New World, the author shows the reader the hardships faced when a society has complete control.  The society makes all the decisions for the people, and they place people in specific groups also known as a caste system.  Imagery, pathos, and diction aided in showing the audience the control the society has over them.

Aldous Huxley, the author of the novel, presented the reader with imagery right off the bat.  He gave them a vivid picture of what the production of people was like in the society. Even though this example shows imagery, the one example that stuck out was at the Savage reservation.  The Savages performed a ritual involving many snakes and dancing all over the place. The Savages gave the reader the idea of how a real society should interact with one another. The World State believes giving its citizens a special type of drug will make each person interact with one another.  It also believes throwing the old out and bringing in the new is the way to go. The Savages prove the World State wrong! Old values bring joy between one another, and it teaches the new generation about the past. For instance, a town in the United States has a block party every year. The idea of the party started many years ago, and it is still being practiced to this day.

At the end of the story, Huxley used diction in a brilliant, depressing way.  John, the Director’s son, had gone against the beliefs of the World State, and he stood out like a sore thumb.  The people of the society directed him to killing himself. The author never came straight out and said he did so.  He used directions to describe the event. The event displays a perfect reason of complete control. John’s beliefs did not match those of the World State, so people thought of him as the outcast.  The power and beliefs lead John down a path of stress, and he unfortunately ended his life. John had a future ahead of him, but the beliefs of a cruel society made him go down the wrong road.

Aiding in diction, pathos can be felt in every part of the book.  John throwing the soma, the “happy” drug used to control the World State, into the water has pathos behind it.  He performed the action because, due to his beliefs, he thought the people were better off without it. The drug was used to bring happiness to the society, but all it brought was control.  Giving people drugs, the World State got exactly what it wanted. In the process, the people’s lives have been all a joke, and John realized it. He knew what reality is like because of living in the Savage reservation.

Being controlled, people are in danger.  John caught up in the power, and he took the wrong way out.  People who are being controlled need to find an alternative for getting out of it.  Whatever that alternative is, run away as quick as possible, or it will end the same way John escaped it.  Nobody deserves to be controlled, and nobody deserves to die from it.

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Lewis Cass High School, Walton, Indiana,
“Brave New World”