Kings' Courier

Filed under A&E

Switched at Birth Review

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






I recently started watching Switched at Birth on Netflix, and I really enjoy it. The show tells the story of two families that experienced a switch at the hospital with their daughters at birth. The show dives deep into how the switch affects the parents and daughters, and it shows the role that the switch plays in the important differences of the girls’ lives.

The families discovered that their daughters were switched at birth after one of the families took a DNA test and were told that the parents weren’t related to the daughter. This occurred right before the girls turned sixteen, so the parents missed out on a lot of their biological daughter’s life. This emotional trauma drove the parents to sue the hospital for the damage. After reaching out to the family of the other daughter, the families met and developed a plan to get to know each other better.

One of the daughters is named Daphne Vasquez and lives with her mom Regina. Daphne lost her hearing at a young age, so the mother and daughter use sign language as a big role in communication. Daphne grew up learning to never take things for granted. She and her mom work hard every day to ensure they live the best life for themselves. Regina is a single mother, and she makes sure she teaches her daughter responsibility even while she deals with her own personal struggles.

The other daughter is Bay Kennish and lives with John and Kathryn Kennish. She also lives with her brother Toby. John was a famous baseball player, so his family has a lot of money. Bay loves to explore her creative and artistic side. She fights for what she believes in while also expressing herself through paintings and other projects.The two girls don’t know exactly how to feel about the whole situation when they first meet. They become grateful to have a chance to finally get to know their biological parents while still being with their families. They eventually begin to spend more time together and develop a special friendship.

I really enjoy this show because it tells the story of two families coming together, looking out for each other, and doing what’s best for everyone. I also enjoy how the show expresses the situations that deaf kids experience every day without being condescending or offensive. It really gives an insight into their lives and how connected they are in the show. I definitely recommend this show to anyone who enjoys shows that are meaningful but also comical sometimes. The show may not be appropriate for younger viewers because of minor language and sexual references. If you’re looking for a new show to watch, consider starting the show Switched at Birth.             

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
1 Comment

One Response to “Switched at Birth Review”

  1. Caleb Johnson on April 10th, 2019 8:26 am

    This show sounds interesting. I’ve seen commercials for it and many reviews. The concept of being “switched at birth” is crazy to me, but it makes for a good show. I’ll give it a try soon. Great Article Katelyn!

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Left
  • Switched at Birth Review

    A&E

    A Star is Born

  • A&E

    Ladies of the Limelight

  • Switched at Birth Review

    A&E

    The Umbrella Academy

  • A&E

    So Here’s Something Odd

  • Switched at Birth Review

    A&E

    Spider-Man Homecoming

  • Switched at Birth Review

    A&E

    Ticking

  • Switched at Birth Review

    A&E

    Lost at Sea

  • Switched at Birth Review

    A&E

    Previewing “In-Lawfully Yours”

  • Switched at Birth Review

    A&E

    You

  • Switched at Birth Review

    A&E

    The Happy Times

Navigate Right
Lewis Cass High School, Walton, Indiana,
Switched at Birth Review